“One of the ironies of a conference dedicated to all things digital and virtual is that the best ways to connect with people are surprisingly old-school.” – Ryan Holmes, CEO of Hootsuite

One hundred and fifty. A number conceived by the anthropologist, Robin Dunbar, who posited that the maximum number of people you can keep relations with is 150.

Think about the number of people that were at the last conference you attended. Conferences are overwhelming. They are like Celine Dion concerts, except louder, harder to navigate, and harder to comprehend.

celine-dion-vidyard

Before attending, we sign up for conferences and get dozens of emails asking us to spend time at various booths, breakfasts, and events. Most consist of the generic templates that sales reps love to use.

During the conference, you are busy learning, networking, and trying to get those premium front row seats for your favorite keynote speakers. With each vendor vying for your business card, it’s hard to keep track of all the conversations you’ve had along the way. Not to mention the days following the event when your inbox and voicemail fill up with different sales reps trying to regain your attention.

After several days of hustling, the question remains: how do sales teams distinguish themselves to the average conference attendee?

Here’s a way to approach connecting with conference attendees and generating pipeline for the next conference you’re sponsoring, and it uses the power of video. Given that it’s hard for attendees to remember who they spoke with at an event, video helps sales teams introduce themselves, recap conversations, and stand out during the post-event chaos.

Here are a few examples:

Before the event

Imagine cutting through that pre-event noise with something more personal.

Like we said, the same templates get shuffled around asking people for meetings, to come to breakfasts, and interact with vendors. There is nothing distinguishing them from the rest of the rabble. A personalized video invite is the best thing you can send to stand out in their inbox.

During the event:

“I don’t remember what we spoke about at your booth.” Sound familiar? With such a busy schedule, the last thing on the average attendees’ mind is keeping diligent notes on every vendor they interacted with.

Using video you can:

  • Recap the session that your prospect presented
  • Recap important conversations you’ve had while they are still fresh
  • Keep yourself top-of-mind by being the person who sent a detailed video

After the event:

The biggest challenge post-event is getting those leads to pay attention and respond. This is where the power of video can help maximize conversions with the people you, or your colleagues, interacted with. If you were to send a video with:

  • An introduction, or reintroduction, of yourself to put a name to a face
  • A brief recap of the conversation they had at the event
  • And an invitation to chat further about your product or services

Then you are guaranteed to stand out from the crowd and much more likely to get your foot in the door. Check out this post-event example that was made:

These methods are great to keep yourself top of mind for people entering conferences, exiting conferences, and everything in between. If you need help getting started on your video event journey, check out Vidyard GoVideo and this blog post on creating your first of many videos.

Benny Hua and Heman Joshi