When you ask someone what they wanted to be when they grew up, chances are the answer you get doesn’t exactly line up with their current day-to-day. But for Notch Video’s Director of Community, Yotam Dor, his career isn’t too far off.

Having spent his childhood making stop-motion animated videos with his parents Hi8 camcorder, Yotam followed his video aspirations straight to post-secondary education. “After completing my masters in film and TV at the Savannah College of Art and Design, I was hired by SCAD to run the Research & Development centre they just launched. Getting that position at the centre was like a mini MBA,” Dor told me in an interview. He stayed at SCAD for two years before returning to Toronto. While he didn’t have a position lined up, Dor took advantage of the opportunity to build a network.

“I scheduled hundreds of coffees and met with everyone in film, TV and advertising,  even though everything in those traditional mediums felt a bit confined — especially after seeing the big world of R&D.” Eventually Dor met up with the team at Notch Video, and joined on as one of their earliest employees. “I wanted to do something that broke through the clutter, and I got really lucky to land at Notch Video at the incubation stage. And I was able to help build it from the ground up with some very talented people.”

Dor now wears many hats at Notch Video, working with new customers on business development all the way to serving as executive producer on larger projects. He also works closely with Notch’s network of over 800 freelancers, spread out across the entire country.

To find out more about the world of video production, and learn how companies and agencies can work more closely together, check out these videos from the rest of our interview:

What’s your favorite part of working in video production?

When I started making stop-motion videos with my parents Hi8 Camcorder, I thought I was going to be an animator, and I treated video like an art. More of a one-person endeavor. Once technology got a bit more democratized though, with non-linear editing systems, I started making movies that required multiple roles, and I got the collaboration bug. So today I would say my favorite part of working in video production is the collaborative environment. Because making videos is such a team sport, you really have to build the right teams for every project. Every once in a while, I’ll grab my cellphone and go into the field and shoot a mobile video just to scratch that itch, but for the most part it’s collaboration that makes me feel really fulfilled.

How has video evolved since you started at Notch Video?

We started Notch Video as a reaction to a broken system. When we started Notch over four years ago, we saw that there was this massive opportunity to create video content for digital channels. At the time, there were no such things as social videos or micro-content, so the spectrum was TV on one end, viral videos on the other, and nothing in between. Client expectations were all about eyeballs. Currently I feel the scrutiny on video and video data is less about views and more about engagement and conversion, but that’s all very early days.

Are there any industries that you see missing out on video?

It really feels to me like almost every industry is using video these days, which we think is great! But there’s this amazing development in the B2B video world that we get really excited about.

There’s an awakening that business and customers are made of — shockingly — people. And that people want to watch engaging stories. I feel it certainly came around when Van Damme’s Epic Split video for Volvo came out and it’s continuing with everything that GE is making. So I’m excited by the potential to see more exciting B2B content, because that’s an exciting area to create content in!

How can businesses and agencies work together better?

Businesses and agencies need to build trust on both sides. If there’s this sentiment that one side is smarter or better you just lose trust. The strongest client relationships are forged over many years by delivering time and time again.

And there’s always going to be better tools, stronger workflows, and all those things. But trust building takes so much time to build, and moments to lose. Nothing breaks barriers like trust.

Jon Spenceley